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How is a collapsed lung treated?

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Your doctor treats a collapsed lung by basically getting rid of the pressure outside the lung so it can inflate again.

In cases so minor that no symptoms show up, the lung may expand again on its own. Some people may need to temporarily breathe oxygen from a container to help.

If the lung has collapsed farther, your doctor may use a needle or tube to suck the extra air from the chest. If there’s a tube, it might have to stay attached for several hours or several days.

From: Pneumothorax (Collapsed Lung) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Collapsed Lung.”

Core Physicians: “Collapsed Lung: Non-Injury-Related.”

Intermountain Healthcare: “Collapsed Lung.”

Lourdes Health System: “Surgery for Collapsed Lung.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pneumothorax.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Pneumothorax.”

University of Wisconsin Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health: “What is Pleurodesis?”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine, “Primary spontaneous pneumothorax.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 24, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Collapsed Lung.”

Core Physicians: “Collapsed Lung: Non-Injury-Related.”

Intermountain Healthcare: “Collapsed Lung.”

Lourdes Health System: “Surgery for Collapsed Lung.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pneumothorax.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Pneumothorax.”

University of Wisconsin Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health: “What is Pleurodesis?”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine, “Primary spontaneous pneumothorax.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 24, 2018

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How does pleurodesis work in treating collapsed lung?

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