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How is aspergillosis diagnosed?

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Aspergillosis is an infection caused by a type of mold called aspergillus. It usually affects your lungs.

Aspergillus, the mold that causes aspergillosis, is quite common. You can find it everywhere, indoors and out. Tiny bits of the mold, called spores, float in the air. Most of us can breathe in these spores without any problem.

But if you’re already sick or have problems with your immune system because of certain illnesses or medications you take, you can get aspergillosis. It isn’t contagious though, so you can’t give it to or catch it from someone else. need surgery to remove them.

To diagnose aspergillosis, your doctor will ask about your medical history, illnesses, and symptoms and do a physical exam. They may also need:

  • A sample of fluid or mucus from your airway to test for mold
  • Imaging tests like an X-ray or CT scan of your lung or affected area
  • A sample of lung tissue (or affected area) to test for mold
  • A blood test can test for invasive aspergillosis

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Aspergillosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Aspergillosis.”

American Thoracic Society: “Aspergillosis.”

CDC: “Aspergillosis.”

Merck Manual: “Aspergillosis.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on April 23, 2020

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Aspergillosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Aspergillosis.”

American Thoracic Society: “Aspergillosis.”

CDC: “Aspergillosis.”

Merck Manual: “Aspergillosis.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on April 23, 2020

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How is aspergillosis treated?

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