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How is pulmonary vascular disease treated if it is brought on by another condition?

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If pulmonary vascular disease is caused by another condition, treating that condition might improve the pulmonary vascular disease:

  • Autoimmune diseases (lupus, scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome) are usually treated with drugs that suppress the immune system. Prednisone, azathioprine (Imuran), and cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) are examples.
  • In lung disease with low blood oxygen levels (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease), providing inhaled oxygen can slow progression of pulmonary vascular disease. Two drugs, nintedanib (Ofev) and pirfenidone (Esbriet) are FDA-approved to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. They act on multiple pathways that may be involved in the scarring of lung tissue. Studies show both medications slow decline in patients when measured by breathing tests. Steroids to reduce inflammation and drugs to suppress the immune system may also be used.

From: Pulmonary Vascular Disease WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mason, R. 4th , Elsevier Saunders, 2005. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicineeditionh

American Lung Association: "Understanding Pulmonary Vascular Disease."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 17, 2017

SOURCES:

Mason, R. 4th , Elsevier Saunders, 2005. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicineeditionh

American Lung Association: "Understanding Pulmonary Vascular Disease."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 17, 2017

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