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How long will I be on medication for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM)?

ANSWER

The type of infection and your overall health may affect how long your treatment will take. Some people take medicines for up to 2 years. Your test results help the doctor decide when you can stop.

SOURCES:

American Lung Association: “Diagnosing and Treating NTM Pulmonary Disease,” “Learn About Nontuberculous Mycobacteria,” “Living With NTM,” “Questions to Ask Your Doctor About NTM Pulmonary Disease.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Managing Your Treatment.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.”

Northern Territory Government of Australia: “Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.”

Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases : “Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease: Clinicians’ Perspectives.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on June 02, 2017

SOURCES:

American Lung Association: “Diagnosing and Treating NTM Pulmonary Disease,” “Learn About Nontuberculous Mycobacteria,” “Living With NTM,” “Questions to Ask Your Doctor About NTM Pulmonary Disease.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Managing Your Treatment.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.”

Northern Territory Government of Australia: “Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.”

Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases : “Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease: Clinicians’ Perspectives.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on June 02, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

How often will I have to take my medicines for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM)?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.