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Should I get a lung and heart transplant for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)?

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Doctors recommend them for people who have tried drugs to treat their disease without success, and whose condition is getting worse. The people who get lung transplants most often are those who have a severe lung disease that’s causing their PAH.

A transplant can improve your life, but it’s serious surgery. It can take several months to recover completely. Though you may not need PAH medications, you’ll need to take drugs to keep your body from rejecting the new organs, probably for the rest of your life. You’ll want to talk to your doctor about the balance of benefits and risks before you go ahead with this treatment.

SOURCES:

Galiè, N.  , 2013. Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Medscape: “The Classification of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension,” “Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Treatment & Management.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pulmonary Hypertension.”

Pulmonary Hypertension Association: “Conventional Medical Therapies,” “Epoprostenol,” “Treatments.”

Heart : “Atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.”

Pulmonary Circulation : “Lung transplantation for pulmonary hypertension.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 02, 2019

SOURCES:

Galiè, N.  , 2013. Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Medscape: “The Classification of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension,” “Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Treatment & Management.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pulmonary Hypertension.”

Pulmonary Hypertension Association: “Conventional Medical Therapies,” “Epoprostenol,” “Treatments.”

Heart : “Atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.”

Pulmonary Circulation : “Lung transplantation for pulmonary hypertension.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 02, 2019

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