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What are symptoms of precordial catch syndrome?

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The telltale symptom of precordial catch syndrome is a sharp pain in the left side of your chest near your heart. You may be able to pinpoint the pain to one small area. It won’t radiate to other parts of your body, like it might for a heart attack.

The pain may feel worse when you breathe in deeply or when you move. So you may choose to stay still and take very shallow breaths while you’re in pain. If you don’t breathe deeply for a while, you may start to feel lightheaded.

Precordial catch syndrome pain usually disappears after 30 seconds to 3 minutes.

SOURCES:

Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin: “Precordial catch syndrome (Texidor’s twinge).”

Archives of Disease in Childhood : “Precordial catch syndrome.”

Tufts Medical Center: “Chest pain.”

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point University Health Service. “Precordial catch syndrome.”

Journal of the American Medical Association : “’Precordial catch,’ a neglected syndrome of precordial pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Chest pain.”

Texas Children’s Hospital: “Sharp chest pain? Your child might have PCS.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on April 20, 2020

SOURCES:

Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin: “Precordial catch syndrome (Texidor’s twinge).”

Archives of Disease in Childhood : “Precordial catch syndrome.”

Tufts Medical Center: “Chest pain.”

University of Wisconsin Stevens Point University Health Service. “Precordial catch syndrome.”

Journal of the American Medical Association : “’Precordial catch,’ a neglected syndrome of precordial pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Chest pain.”

Texas Children’s Hospital: “Sharp chest pain? Your child might have PCS.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on April 20, 2020

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