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What causes pulmonary edema?

ANSWER

Pulmonary edema is usually caused by a problem with the heart, called cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

In many cases, poor pumping creates a buildup of pressure and fluid.

But pulmonary edema isn’t always related to heart problems. It could be from:

It can also be brought on from being in high altitudes, usually above 8,000 feet.

  • A condition called ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Blood clots
  • Damage or injury to your lungs, by inhaling smoke or chemicals or near-drowning
  • Injury or trauma to the brain or nervous system
  • Reaction to some drugs
  • Viral infections

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Pulmonary Edema."

American Heart Association: "Types of Heart Failure."

Up to Date: "Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema."

Medscape: "Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 30, 2020

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Pulmonary Edema."

American Heart Association: "Types of Heart Failure."

Up to Date: "Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema."

Medscape: "Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 30, 2020

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What are other causes of pulmonary edema?

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