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What does incentive spirometer look like?

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It’s made of plastic and is about the size of a small notebook. It has a mouthpiece that looks like a vacuum tube. When you inhale with it, the suction will move a disc or a piston up inside a clear cylinder. The deeper you breathe, the higher the piston rises.

Most spirometers have numbers on the cylinder to show how much air you take in. They also may have a gauge to tell if you’re inhaling at the right pace.

From: What Is an Incentive Spirometer? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Incentive Spirometer.”

UpToDate: “Initial evaluation and management of rib fracture.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Chest Physical Therapy.”

University of Florida Health: “Expiratory muscle strength training versus Incentive Spirometry: what’s the difference?”

KidsHealth: “Incentive Spirometer.”

Hartford HealthCare: “How to Use a Manual Incentive Spirometer.”

Mount Nittany Health: “Using an incentive spirometer,” “Discharge Instructions: Using an Incentive Spirometer (Tracheostomy Tube).”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “How to Use Your Incentive Spirometer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tracheostomy.”

Michigan Surgery & Health Optimization Program: “Breathe: Exercise Your Lungs.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Preventing Pneumonia in the Hospital.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on March 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Incentive Spirometer.”

UpToDate: “Initial evaluation and management of rib fracture.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Chest Physical Therapy.”

University of Florida Health: “Expiratory muscle strength training versus Incentive Spirometry: what’s the difference?”

KidsHealth: “Incentive Spirometer.”

Hartford HealthCare: “How to Use a Manual Incentive Spirometer.”

Mount Nittany Health: “Using an incentive spirometer,” “Discharge Instructions: Using an Incentive Spirometer (Tracheostomy Tube).”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “How to Use Your Incentive Spirometer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tracheostomy.”

Michigan Surgery & Health Optimization Program: “Breathe: Exercise Your Lungs.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Preventing Pneumonia in the Hospital.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on March 15, 2018

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