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What does it mean if I have chest pain while breathing?

ANSWER

If your chest hurts when you breathe in and out, it doesn’t always mean that you’ve pulled a muscle. Sometimes this is a sign of an infection, such as pneumonia. It can also be a symptom of a heart problem.

Chest pain after a workout or stressful event can be due to angina, in which the muscles of your heart don’t get enough blood. Your doctor will want to know if you have those symptoms, so he can test you to see if the problem is likely to lead to other health conditions, like a heart attack.

If you have chest pain lasts longer than 15 minutes or spreads to other parts of your body, or if you feel nauseous, sweaty, or cough up blood, you may be having a heart attack. Call 911 right away.

SOURCES:

NHS Choices: “Shortness of Breath,” “Chest Pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Wheezing.”

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “What Is COPD?”

National Sleep Foundation: “COPD and Difficulty Breathing.”

Victoria State Government/Better Health Channel: “Breathing to Reduce Stress.”

American Academy of Sleep Medicine: “Sleep Apnea – Overview & Facts.”

American Society of Hematology: “Iron-Deficiency Anemia.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 12, 2018

SOURCES:

NHS Choices: “Shortness of Breath,” “Chest Pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Wheezing.”

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “What Is COPD?”

National Sleep Foundation: “COPD and Difficulty Breathing.”

Victoria State Government/Better Health Channel: “Breathing to Reduce Stress.”

American Academy of Sleep Medicine: “Sleep Apnea – Overview & Facts.”

American Society of Hematology: “Iron-Deficiency Anemia.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 12, 2018

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