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What happens when you have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDs)?

ANSWER

When you have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDs), fluid leaks from small blood vessels and builds up in the tiny air sacs in your lungs. Your lungs are then unable to fill up with enough air.

Because of this, the blood traveling to your lungs can’t pick up the amount of oxygen it needs to carry to the rest of your body. That can lead to organs such as your kidneys or brain not working as they should or shutting down. Doctors aren’t sure why some people get ARDS and others don’t.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “ARDS.”

NIH. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is ARDS?”

American Lung Association: “Learn About ARDS.”

American Thoracic Society: “What is Acute Respiratory Syndrome?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “ARDS.”

NIH. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is ARDS?”

American Lung Association: “Learn About ARDS.”

American Thoracic Society: “What is Acute Respiratory Syndrome?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What causes acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDs)?

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