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What if a treatment you take for tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy doesn't help?

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If the drugs you try first don’t work against your TB, you may have a drug-resistant form of the disease.

Your doctor may recommend that you switch to so-called second-line drugs. Some of them aren’t safe to take during pregnancy. They can cause birth defects and other problems. If you need second-line treatment, you may need to avoid or delay getting pregnant. Ask your doctor for counseling.

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Routine tests during pregnancy.”

CDC: “TB treatment and pregnancy,” “TB and pregnancy.”

National Health Service/Public Health England: “Pregnancy and tuberculosis.”

Drug safety : “Drug treatment for tuberculosis during pregnancy: Safety considerations.”

Queensland Health (Australia): “Guideline: Treatment of tuberculosis in pregnant women and newborn infants.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on February 12, 2018

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Routine tests during pregnancy.”

CDC: “TB treatment and pregnancy,” “TB and pregnancy.”

National Health Service/Public Health England: “Pregnancy and tuberculosis.”

Drug safety : “Drug treatment for tuberculosis during pregnancy: Safety considerations.”

Queensland Health (Australia): “Guideline: Treatment of tuberculosis in pregnant women and newborn infants.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on February 12, 2018

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When can you breastfeed your baby if you have tuberculosis (TB)?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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