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what is a bronchoscopy for a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN)?

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This procedure is used for SPNs that are situated closer to the walls of the airways. A bronchoscope (a thin, flexible, lighted tube with a tiny camera at the end) is inserted through the mouth or nose and down the windpipe. From there, it can be inserted into the airways (bronchi) of the lungs. During bronchoscopy, the health care professional takes a biopsy sample from the SPN. If the lesion is not easily accessible on the airway wall or is smaller than 2 cm in diameter, a needle biopsy may be performed. This procedure is called a transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) biopsy.

From: Solitary Pulmonary Nodule WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: Solitary Pulmonary Nodule from eMedicineHealth. American Lung Association: "Lung Cancer Fact Sheet." UpToDate: "Diagnostic evaluation of the incidental pulmonary nodule." CDC: "Nocardiosis."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 21, 2017

SOURCE: Solitary Pulmonary Nodule from eMedicineHealth. American Lung Association: "Lung Cancer Fact Sheet." UpToDate: "Diagnostic evaluation of the incidental pulmonary nodule." CDC: "Nocardiosis."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 21, 2017

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What is a transthoracic needle aspiration (TTNA) biopsy for a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN)?

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