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What is a COPD flare-up?

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When you have COPD, your usual symptoms might become worse rather quickly -- or you may even get new ones.

You may hear your doctor or nurse call this an “exacerbation.” Think of it as a flare-up. During one of these bouts, you may suddenly have more trouble breathing or make more noise when you do.

From: Signs of a COPD Flare-Up WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Breathe: The Lung Association (Canada): “Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Flare-ups.”

COPD Foundation: “Staying Healthy and Avoiding Exacerbations.”

Neil Schachter, MD, professor of pulmonary medicine and medical director of Respiratory Care Department, Mount Sinai Center, New York.

Care Community: “Caring for Others: Breathing Problems.”

European Respiratory Journal : “Standards for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD: a summary of the ATS/ERS position paper.”

National Lung Health Education Program: “Lung -- COPD and Asthma.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "COPD: Learn More Breathe Better."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Breathe: The Lung Association (Canada): “Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease -- Flare-ups.”

COPD Foundation: “Staying Healthy and Avoiding Exacerbations.”

Neil Schachter, MD, professor of pulmonary medicine and medical director of Respiratory Care Department, Mount Sinai Center, New York.

Care Community: “Caring for Others: Breathing Problems.”

European Respiratory Journal : “Standards for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD: a summary of the ATS/ERS position paper.”

National Lung Health Education Program: “Lung -- COPD and Asthma.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "COPD: Learn More Breathe Better."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 14, 2019

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What causes a COPD flare-up?

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