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What is a transtracheal catheter for home oxygen therapy?

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For this surgery, your doctor inserts a small plastic tube called a catheter through your neck just below your Adam’s apple and into your windpipe. A necklace holds the tube in place. The other end connects to your oxygen supply. You can’t see the catheter if your shirt is buttoned to the top. Another advantage is that you need a smaller oxygen flow since it goes directly into your airway. But it has several drawbacks. One is that the opening in your neck could get infected.

From: Home Oxygen Therapy: What to Know WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Thoracic Society: “Oxygen Therapy.”

COPD Foundation: “Oxygen Therapy.”

American Lung Association: “Oxygen Therapy,” “Supplemental Oxygen.”

American Association for Respiratory Care: “Home Oxygen Therapy.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on February 12, 2018

SOURCES:

American Thoracic Society: “Oxygen Therapy.”

COPD Foundation: “Oxygen Therapy.”

American Lung Association: “Oxygen Therapy,” “Supplemental Oxygen.”

American Association for Respiratory Care: “Home Oxygen Therapy.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on February 12, 2018

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What are some safety tips for home oxygen therapy?

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