PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is an incentive spirometer?

ANSWER

The name sounds complicated. But this is a simple handheld gadget that helps keep your lungs clear when you’re off your feet for a while due to certain surgeries, injuries, or health problems.

The breaths you take may not be as deep as usual. That means the air in your lungs may not move much and may not clear out any infections.

You inhale through an incentive spirometer to exercise your lungs and to get air into every nook and cranny. Your doctor may also call it a manual incentive spirometer.

From: What Is an Incentive Spirometer? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Incentive Spirometer.”

UpToDate: “Initial evaluation and management of rib fracture.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Chest Physical Therapy.”

University of Florida Health: “Expiratory muscle strength training versus Incentive Spirometry: what’s the difference?”

KidsHealth: “Incentive Spirometer.”

Hartford HealthCare: “How to Use a Manual Incentive Spirometer.”

Mount Nittany Health: “Using an incentive spirometer,” “Discharge Instructions: Using an Incentive Spirometer (Tracheostomy Tube).”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “How to Use Your Incentive Spirometer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tracheostomy.”

Michigan Surgery & Health Optimization Program: “Breathe: Exercise Your Lungs.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Preventing Pneumonia in the Hospital.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on March 15, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Incentive Spirometer.”

UpToDate: “Initial evaluation and management of rib fracture.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Chest Physical Therapy.”

University of Florida Health: “Expiratory muscle strength training versus Incentive Spirometry: what’s the difference?”

KidsHealth: “Incentive Spirometer.”

Hartford HealthCare: “How to Use a Manual Incentive Spirometer.”

Mount Nittany Health: “Using an incentive spirometer,” “Discharge Instructions: Using an Incentive Spirometer (Tracheostomy Tube).”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “How to Use Your Incentive Spirometer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Tracheostomy.”

Michigan Surgery & Health Optimization Program: “Breathe: Exercise Your Lungs.”

Kaiser Permanente: “Preventing Pneumonia in the Hospital.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on March 15, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What does incentive spirometer look like?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.