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What is interstitial lung disease?

ANSWER

It's an umbrella term for many different conditions that affect the interstitium, a part of your lungs' anatomic structure.

The interstitium is a lace-like network of tissue that extends throughout both lungs. It provides support to your lungs' microscopic air sacs (alveoli). Tiny blood vessels travel through it, allowing gas to move between blood and the air in your lungs. Normally, the interstitium is so thin it can't be seen on chest X-rays or CT scans.

From: Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mason, R. 4th edition, Elsevier Saunders, 2005. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine,

National Jewish Health: "Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Overview."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Occupational Respiratory Disease."

News release, FDA.

UpToDate. 

 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on July 26, 2018

SOURCES:

Mason, R. 4th edition, Elsevier Saunders, 2005. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine,

National Jewish Health: "Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Overview."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Occupational Respiratory Disease."

News release, FDA.

UpToDate. 

 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on July 26, 2018

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What causes interstitial lung disease?

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