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What should I know about pleurisy?

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Pleurisy is a certain type of chest pain. It affects a part of your body you may not have heard of: your pleura.

Your lungs are wrapped in a thin layer of tissue called pleura. They fit snugly within your chest, which is lined with another thin layer of pleura.

These layers keep your bare lungs from rubbing up against the wall of your chest cavity every time that you breathe in. There’s a bit of fluid within the very narrow space between the two layers of pleura to keep everything moving smoothly.

When you’re healthy, you never notice your pleura at work -- but if your pleura has a problem, there’s no doubt you’ll feel it.

From: Pleurisy: What You Should Know WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “What are pleurisy and other pleural disorders?” “What causes pleurisy and other pleural disorders?” “How are pleurisy and other pleural disorders diagnosed?” Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Pleurisy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Symptoms and causes,” “Diagnosis,” “Treatment.”

Cedars-Sinai: “Pleurisy.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 31, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “What are pleurisy and other pleural disorders?” “What causes pleurisy and other pleural disorders?” “How are pleurisy and other pleural disorders diagnosed?” Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Pleurisy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Symptoms and causes,” “Diagnosis,” “Treatment.”

Cedars-Sinai: “Pleurisy.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 31, 2019

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