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What type of breathing problem is bradypnea?

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This is when you’re breathing more slowly than normal. It can mean your body isn’t getting enough oxygen.

Bradypnea can be a sign of a condition that affects your metabolism or another problem, like sleep apnea, carbon monoxide poisoning, or a drug overdose.

SOURCES:

Whited, Lacey: Abnormal Respirations.

The Cleveland Clinic: “Vital signs,” “Dysnpea.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Vital signs,” “Hyperventilation,” “Transient Tachypnea of Newborn.”

Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “ Exercise-induced hyperventilation -- a pseudoasthma syndrome.”

Journal of Behavioral Medicine: “Rebreathing to cope with hyperventilation: experimental tests of the paper bag method.”

International Journal of Psychophysiology: “Hyperventilation in Panic Disorder and Asthma: Empirical Evidence and Clinical Strategies.”

The Mayo Clinic: “Shortness of Breath.”

McGee, Steven. fourth edition. Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis,

Walker, HK. third edition. Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory Examinations,

Journal of Clinical Medicine: “Platypnea–Orthodeoxia Syndrome.”

Journal of Clinical Investigation: “Bradycardia during sleep apnea, characteristics and mechanism.”

Kansas Health System: “Poison facts – carbon monoxide.”

Respirology: “Effect of increasing respiratory rate on airway resistance and reactance in COPD patients.”

EMDocs: “Approach to Tachypnea in the ED Setting.”

Canadian Respiratory Journal : “Altered respiratory physiology in obesity.”

Basic Research in Cardiology : “Exertional hyperpnea in patients with chronic heart failure is a reversible cause of exercise intolerance.”

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine : “The Mechanism of the Exercise Hyperpnea.”

A.T. Still University: “From systemic inflammatory response syndrome (sirs) to bacterial sepsis with shock.”

Heart and Circulatory Physiology: “Increased vasoconstriction predisposes to hyperpnea and postural faint.”

Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine: “Prevalence and treatment of breathing disorders during sleep in patients with heart failure.”

American Family Physician : “Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is and How to Prevent It.”

Stanford Virtual Labs: “Diabetic ketoacidosis.”

Canadian Medical Association Journal: “Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 22, 2018

SOURCES:

Whited, Lacey: Abnormal Respirations.

The Cleveland Clinic: “Vital signs,” “Dysnpea.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Vital signs,” “Hyperventilation,” “Transient Tachypnea of Newborn.”

Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “ Exercise-induced hyperventilation -- a pseudoasthma syndrome.”

Journal of Behavioral Medicine: “Rebreathing to cope with hyperventilation: experimental tests of the paper bag method.”

International Journal of Psychophysiology: “Hyperventilation in Panic Disorder and Asthma: Empirical Evidence and Clinical Strategies.”

The Mayo Clinic: “Shortness of Breath.”

McGee, Steven. fourth edition. Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis,

Walker, HK. third edition. Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory Examinations,

Journal of Clinical Medicine: “Platypnea–Orthodeoxia Syndrome.”

Journal of Clinical Investigation: “Bradycardia during sleep apnea, characteristics and mechanism.”

Kansas Health System: “Poison facts – carbon monoxide.”

Respirology: “Effect of increasing respiratory rate on airway resistance and reactance in COPD patients.”

EMDocs: “Approach to Tachypnea in the ED Setting.”

Canadian Respiratory Journal : “Altered respiratory physiology in obesity.”

Basic Research in Cardiology : “Exertional hyperpnea in patients with chronic heart failure is a reversible cause of exercise intolerance.”

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine : “The Mechanism of the Exercise Hyperpnea.”

A.T. Still University: “From systemic inflammatory response syndrome (sirs) to bacterial sepsis with shock.”

Heart and Circulatory Physiology: “Increased vasoconstriction predisposes to hyperpnea and postural faint.”

Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine: “Prevalence and treatment of breathing disorders during sleep in patients with heart failure.”

American Family Physician : “Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is and How to Prevent It.”

Stanford Virtual Labs: “Diabetic ketoacidosis.”

Canadian Medical Association Journal: “Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on May 22, 2018

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What type of breathing problem is tachypnea?

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