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Can high altitudes cause pulmonary edema?

ANSWER

  • Pulmonary edema can be brought on from being in high altitudes, usually above 8,000 feet. Mountain climbers should get to lower ground and seek medical attention if they have: Chest discomfort
  • Cough
  • Cough with frothy spit that may have some blood in it
  • Fast, irregular heartbeat
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Shortness of breath when they’re active that gets worse over time
  • Trouble walking uphill that leads to trouble walking on a flat surface

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Pulmonary Edema."

American Heart Association: "Types of Heart Failure."

Up to Date: "Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema."

Medscape: "Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Pulmonary Edema."

American Heart Association: "Types of Heart Failure."

Up to Date: "Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema."

Medscape: "Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

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How is pulmonary edema diagnosed?

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