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How can I prevent lupus photosensitivity?

ANSWER

If you are photosensitive, the best rule is to avoid midday and tropical sun entirely. That’s not always possible, but in general, people with lupus should not stay in the sun for long periods and should make every effort to avoid UV rays outside, which are at their peak between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Don’t be fooled by an overcast day, because clouds don’t filter out all of the sun’s UV rays. Also, keep track of the time you spend in the sun. It can take hours to days before skin issues from sun exposure appear.

SOURCES:

Lupus Foundation of America.

American College of Rheumatology, “1997 Update of 1982 American College of Rheumatology Revised Criteria for Classification of Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus.”

Arthritis Foundation. “Lupus.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Sunburn.”

American Melanoma Foundation. “Facts About Sunscreen.”

FDA.

The Johns Hopkins Lupus Center.

American Academy of Dermatology: "Sunscreen FAQs."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on April 22, 2018

SOURCES:

Lupus Foundation of America.

American College of Rheumatology, “1997 Update of 1982 American College of Rheumatology Revised Criteria for Classification of Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus.”

Arthritis Foundation. “Lupus.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Sunburn.”

American Melanoma Foundation. “Facts About Sunscreen.”

FDA.

The Johns Hopkins Lupus Center.

American Academy of Dermatology: "Sunscreen FAQs."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on April 22, 2018

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How does sunscreen help prevent symptoms of lupus photosensitivity?

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