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How can you get lupus?

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You could be born with a gene that makes you more likely to get lupus. Then you might be exposed to something in your environment, and that triggers the disease.

But even if both of these things come together, that still doesn't mean you’ll get lupus. That’s why it’s so hard for doctors to figure out what causes it.

What researchers do know is there are certain things that make you more likely to get it, including your heredity, gender, race, and even previous illnesses.

From: What Causes Lupus? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Casiraghi, C. , 2013. Future Virology

Johns Hopkins: "Causes of Lupus."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Are pollution or toxic chemicals related to lupus?" "Can hormones trigger the development of lupus?" "UV Exposure: What You Need to Know," "What are the risks for developing lupus?" "What causes lupus?" "Which medications cause drug-induced lupus?"

Mak, A. , September 2014. International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Medscape: "Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Casiraghi, C. , 2013. Future Virology

Johns Hopkins: "Causes of Lupus."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Are pollution or toxic chemicals related to lupus?" "Can hormones trigger the development of lupus?" "UV Exposure: What You Need to Know," "What are the risks for developing lupus?" "What causes lupus?" "Which medications cause drug-induced lupus?"

Mak, A. , September 2014. International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Medscape: "Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 12, 2018

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What role do genetics play in the development of lupus?

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