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What are the uses and limitations of an anti-Ro(SSA) and anti-La(SSB) test for lupus?

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Anti-Ro(SSA) and Anti-La(SSB) are two antibodies that are commonly found together. They are specific against ribonucleic acid (RNA) proteins. Anti-Ro is found in anywhere from 24% to 60% of lupus patients. It's also found in 70% of people with another autoimmune disorder called Sjögren's syndrome. Anti-La is found in 35% of people with Sjögren's syndrome. For this reason, their presence may be useful in diagnosing one of these disorders. Both antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus, a rare but potentially serious problem in newborns. In pregnant women, a positive Anti-Ro(SSA) or Anti-La(SSB) warns doctors of the need to monitor the unborn baby. Like other antibodies, the fact that the test is not positive in many people with lupus means it can't be used to diagnose lupus. Also, it is more indicative of Sjögren's syndrome than of lupus.

From: Lab Tests for Lupus WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital: "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Lupus: A Patient Care Guide for Nurses and Other Health Professionals, 3rd Edition."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Lab Tests."

NYU School of Medicine: "Neonatal Lupus."

Lupus Alliance of America: "Laboratory Tests for Lupus."

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh: "Diagnosing Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Diseases."

Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation.

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 23, 2017

SOURCES:

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital: "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Lupus: A Patient Care Guide for Nurses and Other Health Professionals, 3rd Edition."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Lab Tests."

NYU School of Medicine: "Neonatal Lupus."

Lupus Alliance of America: "Laboratory Tests for Lupus."

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh: "Diagnosing Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Diseases."

Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation.

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 23, 2017

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What are the uses and limitations of a C-reactive protein test for lupus?

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