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What role do genetics play in the development of lupus?

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Your genes are the sets of instructions that tell your body how to work. Changes to your genes can sometimes lead to disease.

Scientists haven't found any single gene that causes lupus. Yet people with lupus are more likely to have changes to the genes that help their immune system recognize and respond to viruses and other germs.

From: What Causes Lupus? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Casiraghi, C. , 2013. Future Virology

Johns Hopkins: "Causes of Lupus."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Are pollution or toxic chemicals related to lupus?" "Can hormones trigger the development of lupus?" "UV Exposure: What You Need to Know," "What are the risks for developing lupus?" "What causes lupus?" "Which medications cause drug-induced lupus?"

Mak, A. , September 2014. International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Medscape: "Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Casiraghi, C. , 2013. Future Virology

Johns Hopkins: "Causes of Lupus."

Lupus Foundation of America: "Are pollution or toxic chemicals related to lupus?" "Can hormones trigger the development of lupus?" "UV Exposure: What You Need to Know," "What are the risks for developing lupus?" "What causes lupus?" "Which medications cause drug-induced lupus?"

Mak, A. , September 2014. International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Medscape: "Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 12, 2018

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What are your chances of getting lupus if it runs in your family?

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