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How can skin cancer support groups and counseling help?

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Some people don't want to "burden" their loved ones, or prefer talking about their concerns with a more neutral professional. A social worker, counselor, or member of the clergy can be helpful. Your dermatologist or oncologist should be able to recommend someone.

Many people with cancer are profoundly helped by talking to other people who have cancer. Sharing your concerns with others who have been through the same thing can be remarkably reassuring. Support groups for people with cancer may be available through the medical center where you are receiving your treatment. The American Cancer Society also has information about support groups throughout the U.S.

From: Skin Cancer WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: News release, Mela Sciences. National Cancer Institute. American Cancer Society.

Skin Cancer from eMedicineHealth

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Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 30, 2016

SOURCES: News release, Mela Sciences. National Cancer Institute. American Cancer Society.

Skin Cancer from eMedicineHealth

FDA

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 30, 2016

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