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What are melanomas?

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Melanoma, is a potentially aggressive, life-threatening skin cancer. It can start in dark skin tissue, such as a mole or birthmark, as well as in normally pigmented skin. For men, it generally shows up first on your head, neck, or between your shoulders and hips. Women tend to get it on their arms and legs. You may also find it on the palm of your hand, on the sole of your foot, under a fingernail or toenail, in mucus linings (in your mouth, vagina, or anus, for example), and even in your eye.

Melanoma is not that hard to find and usually curable if treated early. But it grows faster than other types of skin cancer, and it can spread beyond your skin to other parts of the body, including your bones and brain. Then it's very hard to treat and can't be cured.

From: What Is Skin Cancer? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Skin Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Skin Cancer," "Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) - Patient Version: Treatment Options."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer: Basal and Squamous Cells," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 10, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Skin Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Skin Cancer," "Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) - Patient Version: Treatment Options."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer: Basal and Squamous Cells," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 10, 2017

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Who gets skin cancer?

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