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What are the risks associated with Mohs surgery?

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Mohs surgery is generally considered very safe, but there are some risks, including:

Although these are less likely to happen, there are other potential problems, such as:

  • Bleeding from the site of surgery
  • Bleeding into the wound (hematoma) from surrounding tissue
  • Pain or tenderness in the area where skin was removed
  • Infection
  • You could have temporary or permanent numbness in the area where the skin was removed.
  • If your tumor was large and your surgeon cut a muscle nerve while removing it, you might feel some weakness in that part of your body.
  • You might feel itching or shooting pain.
  • You could develop a thick, raised scar.

From: What Is Mohs Surgery? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Mohs surgery.”

American College of Mohs Surgery: “History of Mohs Surgery,” “Post-Operative Care.”

University of Chicago, Section of Dermatology: “Mohs surgery: Questions and Answers Regarding Your Procedure.”

Skin Cancer Foundation: “Mohs surgery.”

NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms: “Mohs surgery.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Mohs surgery.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 15, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Mohs surgery.”

American College of Mohs Surgery: “History of Mohs Surgery,” “Post-Operative Care.”

University of Chicago, Section of Dermatology: “Mohs surgery: Questions and Answers Regarding Your Procedure.”

Skin Cancer Foundation: “Mohs surgery.”

NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms: “Mohs surgery.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Mohs surgery.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 15, 2017

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