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What is immunotherapy for melanoma?

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Sometimes called "biologic therapy," immunotherapy uses drugs that help your immune system find and attack cancer cells. You might get them in a shot or go to a treatment center or hospital to get them through an IV every two to four weeks. If the melanoma is on your face, your doctor might prescribe a cream that revs up the immune cells only around the tumor, instead of in your whole body like the other drugs.

Sometimes, immunotherapy drugs can make your body attack your healthy organs. If that happens, you’ll need to stop taking them and get other treatment to stop the attack.

From: Treatments for Melanoma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: “Melanoma: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome.”

The Skin Cancer Foundation: “Melanoma—Treatments.”

American Cancer Society: “Surgery for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Immunotherapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Chemotherapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Genes and Cancer,” ”Targeted Therapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Radiation Therapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “What Happens After Treatment for Melanoma Skin Cancer?”

National Cancer Institute: “Melanoma Treatment (PDQ),” “Lymphedema (PDQ).”

Melanoma Research Foundation: “Melanoma Treatment.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Melanoma: Managing Treatment Side Effects.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Melanoma: Coping with Side Effects.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 9, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: “Melanoma: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome.”

The Skin Cancer Foundation: “Melanoma—Treatments.”

American Cancer Society: “Surgery for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Immunotherapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Chemotherapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Genes and Cancer,” ”Targeted Therapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “Radiation Therapy for Melanoma Skin Cancer,” “What Happens After Treatment for Melanoma Skin Cancer?”

National Cancer Institute: “Melanoma Treatment (PDQ),” “Lymphedema (PDQ).”

Melanoma Research Foundation: “Melanoma Treatment.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Melanoma: Managing Treatment Side Effects.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Melanoma: Coping with Side Effects.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 9, 2018

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What is chemotherapy for melanoma?

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