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What is the outlook for keratoacanthoma?

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It’s not unusual for a single keratoacanthoma to shrink and disappear on its own after several months, but it may leave a worse scar than one from surgery. It could also come back, so it’s best to get it removed.

If you don’t treat it, keratoacanthoma can spread throughout your body.

From: What is Keratoacanthoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Journal of Investigative Dermatology : “Are Keratoacanthomas Variants of Squamous Cell Carcinomas? A Comparison of Chromosomal Aberrations by Comparative Genomic Hybridization.”

Medscape: “Keratoacanthoma.”

Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education: “Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer.”

James Spencer, MD, dermatologist in private practice in St. Petersburg, FL, and clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Skin Cancer Foundation: “Squamous Cell Carcinoma.”

American Academy of Dermatology: “Squamous Cell Carcinoma.”

DermNet New Zealand: “Keratoacanthoma,” “Multiple Self-Healing Squamous Epitheliomas of Ferguson-Smith,”  “Grzybowski Generalized Eruptive Keratoacanthomas.”

Ronald Davis, MD, dermatologist in private practice; adjunct professor of dermatology, University of Texas Medical School San Antonio.

American Family Physician : “Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.”

American Society of Dermatologic Surgery: “Skin Cancer Information.”

OrphaNet: “Multiple Self-Healing Squamous Epithelioma.”

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on March 06, 2017

SOURCES:

Journal of Investigative Dermatology : “Are Keratoacanthomas Variants of Squamous Cell Carcinomas? A Comparison of Chromosomal Aberrations by Comparative Genomic Hybridization.”

Medscape: “Keratoacanthoma.”

Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education: “Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer.”

James Spencer, MD, dermatologist in private practice in St. Petersburg, FL, and clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Skin Cancer Foundation: “Squamous Cell Carcinoma.”

American Academy of Dermatology: “Squamous Cell Carcinoma.”

DermNet New Zealand: “Keratoacanthoma,” “Multiple Self-Healing Squamous Epitheliomas of Ferguson-Smith,”  “Grzybowski Generalized Eruptive Keratoacanthomas.”

Ronald Davis, MD, dermatologist in private practice; adjunct professor of dermatology, University of Texas Medical School San Antonio.

American Family Physician : “Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.”

American Society of Dermatologic Surgery: “Skin Cancer Information.”

OrphaNet: “Multiple Self-Healing Squamous Epithelioma.”

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on March 06, 2017

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How can you prevent keratoacanthoma?

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