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When should I tell my family about my melanoma diagnosis and how much should I tell them?

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Don't let yourself be rushed to tell your family about your melanoma diagnosis. You can decide if and when you're ready to reveal information. Also, it's okay to put limits on how much you say.

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Seeking a Second Opinion," "How A Child Understands Cancer," "Supporting a Friend Who Has Cancer."

Melanoma International Foundation: "Newly Diagnosed?" "Talking to Your Children About Melanoma."

Aim at Melanoma Foundation: "Getting A Second Opinion."

Melanoma Research Foundation: "Just diagnosed with melanoma?"

Cancer Support Community: "Communicating with Your Health Care Team About Metastatic Melanoma," "Tips for Coping."

Patient Advocate Foundation: "Second Opinions."

National Cancer Institute: "Taking Time."

Melanoma Foundation New England: "Just Diagnosed," "Talking with Your Family About Melanoma."

University of Pennsylvania: "Talking To Your Children About Your Cancer Diagnosis."

American Cancer Society: "Talking With Friends and Relatives About Your Cancer," "Road to Recovery."

Providence Regional Cancer Partnership: "Share the Care Mobilizes Volunteers to Assist with Patient's Needs."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on June 1, 2018

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Seeking a Second Opinion," "How A Child Understands Cancer," "Supporting a Friend Who Has Cancer."

Melanoma International Foundation: "Newly Diagnosed?" "Talking to Your Children About Melanoma."

Aim at Melanoma Foundation: "Getting A Second Opinion."

Melanoma Research Foundation: "Just diagnosed with melanoma?"

Cancer Support Community: "Communicating with Your Health Care Team About Metastatic Melanoma," "Tips for Coping."

Patient Advocate Foundation: "Second Opinions."

National Cancer Institute: "Taking Time."

Melanoma Foundation New England: "Just Diagnosed," "Talking with Your Family About Melanoma."

University of Pennsylvania: "Talking To Your Children About Your Cancer Diagnosis."

American Cancer Society: "Talking With Friends and Relatives About Your Cancer," "Road to Recovery."

Providence Regional Cancer Partnership: "Share the Care Mobilizes Volunteers to Assist with Patient's Needs."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on June 1, 2018

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Do I need a support system for melanoma?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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