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Who is more likely to get skin cancer?

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People with many freckles or moles, particularly odd-looking ones, may be vulnerable to melanoma. It's possible for dark-skinned people to get skin cancer, but it's rare and usually on lighter areas of their body, such as the soles of the feet or under fingernails or toenails.

Where you live also plays a role. Places with intense sunshine, such as Arizona and Hawaii, have a larger share of people with skin cancer. It's more common in places where fair-skinned people moved from less sunny areas, like Australia, which was settled largely by fair-skinned people of Irish and English descent.

About 3 times more men than women get skin cancer. It's more likely when you're older. Most people diagnosed are between ages 45 and 54, although more younger people are now being affected. If you or any close relatives have had skin cancer, your chances go up.

From: What Is Skin Cancer? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Skin Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Skin Cancer," "Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) - Patient Version: Treatment Options."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer: Basal and Squamous Cells," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 10, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Skin Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Skin Cancer," "Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) - Patient Version: Treatment Options."

American Cancer Society: "Skin Cancer: Basal and Squamous Cells," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 10, 2017

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What is the treatment for skin cancer?

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