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What are the pros and cons of using minimally invasive procedure to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?

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Minimally invasive procedures require only small surgical cuts or other methods to treat BPH, also called enlarged prostate. They use energy sources to destroy extra prostate tissue that might be making it hard for you to pee. These procedures are usually done in your doctor’s office. Overall, these procedures may work better than drugs at easing symptoms but may not be as effective in some cases as traditional endoscopic or open surgery

SOURCES:

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.

American Urological Association. "Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)" 2018

Agency for Healthcare Policy Research.

William Jaffe, MD, professor of urology at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Urology Care Foundation, “What Are The Symptoms of BPH?”

Mayo Clinic, “Minimally invasive surgery.”

Medscape, “Male Uretha Anatomy: Overview,” “General anesthesia.”

National Health Service (U.K.), “Local anaesthesia: Introduction.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on October 30, 2018

SOURCES:

National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.

American Urological Association. "Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)" 2018

Agency for Healthcare Policy Research.

William Jaffe, MD, professor of urology at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Urology Care Foundation, “What Are The Symptoms of BPH?”

Mayo Clinic, “Minimally invasive surgery.”

Medscape, “Male Uretha Anatomy: Overview,” “General anesthesia.”

National Health Service (U.K.), “Local anaesthesia: Introduction.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on October 30, 2018

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What are some minimally invasive therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?

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