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How can I prevent high blood pressure?

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To prevent high blood pressure, first consider your diet. A healthy diet can go a long way toward preventing high blood pressure. Trying following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan, also known as the DASH diet, which emphasizes plenty of fruits and vegetables and low-fat or nonfat dairy products. Studies conducted by the National Institutes of Health have shown that the DASH diet can lower blood pressure. And the results show up fast -- often within two weeks. At the same time, cut down on salt (sodium chloride), which can raise blood pressure. The National High Blood Pressure Education Program recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day. The ideal is even lower -- only 1,500. For the average man, who consumes about 4,200 milligrams a day, that requires a big change. But studies show that the lower your salt intake, the lower your blood pressure.

From: High Blood Pressure WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure with the DASH Diet.” National Institutes of Health: “Prevent and Control High Blood Pressure: Mission Possible.” Parker, et al, , April 2007. American Medical Association. American Journal of Public Health

Reviewed by James Beckerman on January 14, 2017

SOURCES: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure with the DASH Diet.” National Institutes of Health: “Prevent and Control High Blood Pressure: Mission Possible.” Parker, et al, , April 2007. American Medical Association. American Journal of Public Health

Reviewed by James Beckerman on January 14, 2017

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What are other things you can do to prevent high blood pressure?

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