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What are the main signs of chronic prostatitis (CP) or chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS)?

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The main sign of this condition is pain that lasts more than 3 months in at least one of these body parts:

You may also have pain when you pee or ejaculate. You might not be able to hold your urine, or you may have to pee more than 8 times a day. A weak urine stream is another common symptom of this condition.

  • Penis (often at the tip)
  • Scrotum
  • Between your scrotum and rectum (the perineum)
  • Lower abdomen

From: What is Prostatitis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Prostatitis.”

Urology Care Foundation: “What are Prostatitis and Related Chronic Pelvic Pain Conditions?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate.”

Harvard Medical School + Harvard Health Publications: “Prostatitis: inflamed prostate can be a vexing health problem.”

NHS Choices: “Prostatitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Prostatitis.”

Medscape: “Prostatitis.”

Prostate Cancer UK: “Prostatitis: A guide to infection and inflammation of the prostate.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on March 16, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Prostatitis.”

Urology Care Foundation: “What are Prostatitis and Related Chronic Pelvic Pain Conditions?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate.”

Harvard Medical School + Harvard Health Publications: “Prostatitis: inflamed prostate can be a vexing health problem.”

NHS Choices: “Prostatitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Prostatitis.”

Medscape: “Prostatitis.”

Prostate Cancer UK: “Prostatitis: A guide to infection and inflammation of the prostate.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on March 16, 2017

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When are you most likely to have problems with prostatitis?

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