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What can a man do if his acne won't go away?

ANSWER

It may be time to see a dermatologist.

The doctor will check your skin and recommend a treatment plan. You might need a prescription for antibiotics, prescription-strength benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid, or a type of drug called retinoids.

If your acne is severe, your dermatologist may consider a drug called isotretinoin. Women who plan to get pregnant can't use this drug because it can cause birth defects. But men who are using it don't need to take extra precautions to avoid getting their partner pregnant.

From: What Men Should Know About Acne WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Purdy, S. , Jan. 5, 2011. Clinical Evidence

Doris Day, MD, dermatologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City.

Jonette Keri, MD, PhD, associate professor of dermatology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

March of Dimes: "Accutane and other retinoids."

Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, NYU Langone Medical Center.

American Academy of Dermatology: "Adult Acne: A Fact of Life for Many Women."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on March 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Purdy, S. , Jan. 5, 2011. Clinical Evidence

Doris Day, MD, dermatologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City.

Jonette Keri, MD, PhD, associate professor of dermatology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

March of Dimes: "Accutane and other retinoids."

Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, NYU Langone Medical Center.

American Academy of Dermatology: "Adult Acne: A Fact of Life for Many Women."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on March 14, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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