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What should you do after you begin exercising for weight gain after menopause?

ANSWER

After you begin exercising:

  • Allow at least 10 minutes to warm up before starting to exercise rigorously. To do this, choose an activity that gently works major muscles.
  • Before you work out, stretch the muscles that will absorb most of the shock of your exercise routine.
  • If you have any new pain while exercising, stop and let your doctor know.
  • Gradually boost the distance, length, or intensity of your workout.
  • Mix it up. Do different exercises to keep from getting bored and to keep your body challenged.

SOURCES:

Obesity Society: "Obesity in U.S. Adults: 2007."

Consumer Reports : "Working up a sweat helps women deal with menopause" and "Stay active and fit."

Weight Control Information Network: "Understanding Obesity."

Medscape: "Exercise, Weight Gain, and Menopause."

American Osteopathic Association: "Exercise in Post-Menopausal Women."

American Council on Fitness: "Exercise and Menopause."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 15, 2019

SOURCES:

Obesity Society: "Obesity in U.S. Adults: 2007."

Consumer Reports : "Working up a sweat helps women deal with menopause" and "Stay active and fit."

Weight Control Information Network: "Understanding Obesity."

Medscape: "Exercise, Weight Gain, and Menopause."

American Osteopathic Association: "Exercise in Post-Menopausal Women."

American Council on Fitness: "Exercise and Menopause."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 15, 2019

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What are some tips for the best fitness results for weight gain after menopause?

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