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Can opioid addition lead to changes in your brain?

ANSWER

Opioid addiction leads to real changes in certain areas of your brain. Prescription drug addiction alters the circuits responsible for mood and reward behavior.

SOURCES:

Carroll K.M.   2005. American Journal of Psychiatry,

FDA. "FDA approves first buprenorphine implant for treatment of opioid dependence."

Kosten, T.R. 2003. New England Journal of Medicine,

Mattick, R.P. 2003. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews,

Medline Plus: "Opiate withdrawal."

Moore & Jefferson, 2nd edition, Mosby 2004. Handbook of Medical Psychiatry,

Narcotics Anonymous web site.

National Library of Medicine web site.

Van den Brink, W. 2006. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry,

National Institutes of Health: “How Do Opioids Work?”

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy : “Addiction Relapse and Its Predictors: A Prospective Study.”

SAMHSA: “Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.”

PubMed Health: “Buprenorphine,” “Naloxone."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “How Do Medications to Treat Opioid Addiction Work?”

Medscape: “Opioid Abuse Treatment & Management.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 19, 2018

SOURCES:

Carroll K.M.   2005. American Journal of Psychiatry,

FDA. "FDA approves first buprenorphine implant for treatment of opioid dependence."

Kosten, T.R. 2003. New England Journal of Medicine,

Mattick, R.P. 2003. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews,

Medline Plus: "Opiate withdrawal."

Moore & Jefferson, 2nd edition, Mosby 2004. Handbook of Medical Psychiatry,

Narcotics Anonymous web site.

National Library of Medicine web site.

Van den Brink, W. 2006. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry,

National Institutes of Health: “How Do Opioids Work?”

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy : “Addiction Relapse and Its Predictors: A Prospective Study.”

SAMHSA: “Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.”

PubMed Health: “Buprenorphine,” “Naloxone."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “How Do Medications to Treat Opioid Addiction Work?”

Medscape: “Opioid Abuse Treatment & Management.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 19, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

If you misuse opioid drugs, can you get withdrawal symptoms if you quit suddenly?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

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