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How do I know if I am abusing prescription drugs?

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If you are abusing them, you may be taking larger doses than your doctor prescribed, or using them for reasons other than prescribed. Your doctor may notice that you call more often for refills for the medication or that you're asking for larger amounts of it. This may also be a sign of abusing prescription drugs. Also, your pharmacist may notice prescription drug abuse by spotting false or altered prescription forms or multiple prescriptions for controlled substances from different doctors.

From: Prescription Drug Abuse WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FDA: "Prescription Drug Use and Abuse," "FDA approves first buprenorphine implant for treatment of opioid dependence."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "Topics in Brief: Prescription Drug Abuse."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "Trends in prescription drug abuse."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on February 6, 2018

SOURCES:

FDA: "Prescription Drug Use and Abuse," "FDA approves first buprenorphine implant for treatment of opioid dependence."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "Topics in Brief: Prescription Drug Abuse."

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "Trends in prescription drug abuse."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on February 6, 2018

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How can buprenorphine help with treating prescription drug abuse?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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