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What is cocaine?

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Cocaine is a highly addictive drug that ups your levels of alertness, attention, and energy. You may hear it called a stimulant. It’s made from the coca plant, which is native to South America. It’s illegal in the U.S. It comes in a few different forms. The most common is a fine, white powder. It can also be made into a solid rock crystal. Most cocaine users snort the white powder into their nose. Some rub it onto their gums or dissolve it in water and inject it with a needle. Others heat up the rock crystal and breathe the smoke into their lungs.

From: What Is Cocaine? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: Treating Cocaine Addiction,” “Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction,” “What Are Stimulants?” “What are the long-term effects of cocaine use?” “What is Cocaine?”

Foundation for a Drug-Free World: “Effects of Cocaine.”

Center for Substance Abuse Research: “Cocaine (Powder).”

SAMHSA/CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocols: “Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment.”

Narconon: “Signs and Symptoms of Cocaine Use.”

UpToDate: “Cocaine use disorder in adults: “Epidemiology, pharmacology, clinical manifestations, medical consequences, and diagnosis.”

The University of Arizona Methamphetamine and Other Illicit drug Education: “Cocaine Overdose.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on September 11, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: Treating Cocaine Addiction,” “Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction,” “What Are Stimulants?” “What are the long-term effects of cocaine use?” “What is Cocaine?”

Foundation for a Drug-Free World: “Effects of Cocaine.”

Center for Substance Abuse Research: “Cocaine (Powder).”

SAMHSA/CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocols: “Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment.”

Narconon: “Signs and Symptoms of Cocaine Use.”

UpToDate: “Cocaine use disorder in adults: “Epidemiology, pharmacology, clinical manifestations, medical consequences, and diagnosis.”

The University of Arizona Methamphetamine and Other Illicit drug Education: “Cocaine Overdose.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on September 11, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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