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What's the link between binge eating disorder and depression?

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Binge eating disorder often goes and-in-hand with depression. Researchers are studying whether brain chemicals or metabolism (the way your body uses food) play roles. The disorder also runs in some families. Women are more likely than men to have it. Some people with binge eating disorder have gone through emotional or physical abuse, or had addictions, such as alcoholism. If that sounds like you, getting help with those issues will be part of getting better.

From: Binge Eating Disorder WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Binge Eating Disorder Association.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders: "Binge Eating Disorder."

National Eating Disorders Association: "Binge Eating Disorder."

Weight-Control Information Network: "Binge Eating Disorder."

Womenshealth.gov: "Binge Eating Disorder Fact Sheet."

American Psychiatric Association: "Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-5."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2019

SOURCES:

Binge Eating Disorder Association.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders: "Binge Eating Disorder."

National Eating Disorders Association: "Binge Eating Disorder."

Weight-Control Information Network: "Binge Eating Disorder."

Womenshealth.gov: "Binge Eating Disorder Fact Sheet."

American Psychiatric Association: "Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-5."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2019

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What are some of the signs of binge eating disorder?

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