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When can you be diagnosed of binge eating disorder (BED)?

ANSWER

You can be diagnosed with BED if you:

  • Binge regularly -- on average, at least once a week for at least three months
  • Eat a large quantity of food (more than others would eat) in a short amount of time, such as two hours, while feeling like you can’t stop or control how much you’re eating
  • Eat when you’re not hungry
  • Eat until you feel uncomfortably full
  • Eat more quickly than usual
  • Eat alone out of embarrassment
  • Feel upset about your binges
  • Feel guilty, depressed, or disgusted afterward

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Binge Eating Disorder.”

National Eating Disorders Association: “Binge Eating Disorder.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Eating Disorders.”

Gearhardt, A. , September 2011. Current Drug Abuse Reviews

Pinaquay, S. , February 2003. Obesity Research

Mayo Clinic: “Binge-Eating Disorder.”

Helder, S. , 2011. Current Topics in Behavioral Science

Fairburn, C. , May 1998. Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Binge Eating Disorder.”

National Eating Disorders Association: “Binge Eating Disorder.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Eating Disorders.”

Gearhardt, A. , September 2011. Current Drug Abuse Reviews

Pinaquay, S. , February 2003. Obesity Research

Mayo Clinic: “Binge-Eating Disorder.”

Helder, S. , 2011. Current Topics in Behavioral Science

Fairburn, C. , May 1998. Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

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What are risk-factors of binge eating disorder (BED)?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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