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How is body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) similar to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

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People with OCD have recurring and distressing thoughts, fears, or images (obsessions) that they can't control. These thoughts cause anxiety that leads to an urgent need to perform certain rituals or routines (compulsions). With BDD, a person's preoccupation with a part of their body often leads to ritualistic behaviors, such as constantly looking in a mirror or picking at the skin. They eventually become so obsessed with their "defect" that it affects their social life, work, and relationships.

From: Body Dysmorphic Disorder WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Body dysmorphic disorder."

The Merck Manual: "Somatoform Disorders in Children."

OCD Center of Los Angeles: "Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) - Symptoms and Treatment."

Center for Family Therapy: "Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Body dysmorphic disorder."

The Merck Manual: "Somatoform Disorders in Children."

OCD Center of Los Angeles: "Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) - Symptoms and Treatment."

Center for Family Therapy: "Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

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Who can get body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)?

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