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What are posttraumatic stress disorder triggers?

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Certain triggers can set off your PTSD. They bring back strong memories. You may feel like you’re living through it all over again. Triggers can include sights, sounds, smells, or thoughts that remind you of the traumatic event in some way.

Some PTSD triggers are obvious, such as seeing a news report of an assault. Others are less clear. For example, if you were attacked on a sunny day, seeing a bright blue sky might make you upset.

From: What Are PTSD Triggers? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Lori Zoellner, Ph.D., professor of psychology, University of Washington, Seattle.

JoAnne Difede, Ph.D., director of the Program for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Studies, NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill-Cornell Medicine.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “PTSD: National Center for PTSD.”

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: “Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services.”

Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience: “Emotion and Cognition Interactions in PTSD: A Review of Neurocongitive and Neuroimaging Studies.”

National Institutes of Mental Health: “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 15, 2019

SOURCES:

Lori Zoellner, Ph.D., professor of psychology, University of Washington, Seattle.

JoAnne Difede, Ph.D., director of the Program for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Studies, NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill-Cornell Medicine.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “PTSD: National Center for PTSD.”

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: “Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services.”

Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience: “Emotion and Cognition Interactions in PTSD: A Review of Neurocongitive and Neuroimaging Studies.”

National Institutes of Mental Health: “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 15, 2019

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How do you develop posttraumatic stress disorder triggers?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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