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What are the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

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Symptoms of PTSD often are grouped into four main categories, including:

  • Reliving: People with PTSD repeatedly relive the ordeal through thoughts and memories of the trauma. These may include flashbacks, hallucinations, and nightmares. They also may feel great distress when certain things remind them of the trauma, such as the anniversary date of the event.
  • Avoiding: The person may avoid people, places, thoughts, or situations that may remind him or her of the trauma. This can lead to feelings of detachment and isolation from family and friends, as well as a loss of interest in activities that the person once enjoyed.
  • Increased arousal: These include excessive emotions; problems relating to others, including feeling or showing affection; difficulty falling or staying asleep; irritability; outbursts of anger; difficulty concentrating; and being "jumpy" or easily startled. The person may also suffer physical symptoms, such as increased blood pressure and heart rate, rapid breathing, muscle tension, nausea, and diarrhea.
  • Negative Cognitions and Mood: This refers to thoughts and feelings related to blame, estrangement, and memories of the traumatic event.

From: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE:

National Alliance on Mental Illness. 

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 25, 2018

SOURCE:

National Alliance on Mental Illness. 

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 25, 2018

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How does posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affect children?

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