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What are treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

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OCD doesn’t go away on its own, and it has no cure. You can’t ignore it or think your way out of the repetitive thoughts and behaviors that control your life. What you can control is your decision to get treatment.

An exam can show if your symptoms come from a physical issue. If they’re not, your doctor can recommend a mental illness specialist, like a psychologist, psychiatrist, or social worker, who can create a plan for you.

For many people, combining talk therapy and medication works best.

From: What Are the Treatments for OCD? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: When Unwanted Thoughts or Irresistible Actions Take Over," "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)."

OCD-UK: "Understanding what drives OCD."

Mayo Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder," "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),” "Deep brain stimulation."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: When Unwanted Thoughts or Irresistible Actions Take Over," "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)."

OCD-UK: "Understanding what drives OCD."

Mayo Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder," "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),” "Deep brain stimulation."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 12, 2018

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How can cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) help with treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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