PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What can I expect with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

ANSWER

At first, you'll talk about the traumatic event with your therapist and how your thoughts related to it affect your life. Then you'll write in detail about what happened. This helps you see how you think about your trauma and figure out new ways to deal with it.

For example, if you've been blaming yourself for something, your therapist might help you take into account all the things that were beyond your control, so you can understand and accept that it wasn't your fault.

CBT is a 12-week course of treatment, with weekly sessions of 60-90 minutes.

From: What Are the Treatments for PTSD? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Post-traumatic Stress Disorder."

Cleveland Clinic: "Anxiety Disorders."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Treatment of PTSD," "Clinician's Guide to Medications for PTSD," "Medications for PTSD."

UpToDate: "Pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in adults."

Society of Clinical Psychology: "Stress Inoculation Training for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder."

Medscape: "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Medication."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 07, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Post-traumatic Stress Disorder."

Cleveland Clinic: "Anxiety Disorders."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Treatment of PTSD," "Clinician's Guide to Medications for PTSD," "Medications for PTSD."

UpToDate: "Pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in adults."

Society of Clinical Psychology: "Stress Inoculation Training for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder."

Medscape: "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Medication."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 07, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What can I expect with prolonged exposure (PE) therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: