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What can I expect with prolonged exposure (PE) therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

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If you've been avoiding things that remind you of the traumatic event, PE will help you confront them. It involves 8 to 15 sessions, usually 90 minutes each.

Your therapist will teach you breathing methods to ease your anxiety when you think about what happened. Later, you'll make a list of the things you've been avoiding and learn how to face them, one by one. In another session, you'll tell your therapist about your experience, then go home and listen to a recording of yourself. Doing this over time may help ease your symptoms.

From: What Are the Treatments for PTSD? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Post-traumatic Stress Disorder."

Cleveland Clinic: "Anxiety Disorders."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Treatment of PTSD," "Clinician's Guide to Medications for PTSD," "Medications for PTSD."

UpToDate: "Pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in adults."

Society of Clinical Psychology: "Stress Inoculation Training for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder."

Medscape: "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Medication."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 07, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Post-traumatic Stress Disorder."

Cleveland Clinic: "Anxiety Disorders."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Treatment of PTSD," "Clinician's Guide to Medications for PTSD," "Medications for PTSD."

UpToDate: "Pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in adults."

Society of Clinical Psychology: "Stress Inoculation Training for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder."

Medscape: "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Medication."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 07, 2017

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How can eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) help with treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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