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What drugs treat attention deficit hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD)?

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Another group of drugs called stimulants may be used for certain disorders, primarily attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The most commonly used stimulants include amphetamine salt combo (Adderall, Adderall XR), Daytrana, dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse), and methylphenidate (Concerta, Quillivant XR, Ritalin). Recently, the FDA approved a once-a-day treatment of mixed salts of a single-entity amphetamine product called Mydayis.

A class of drugs, called alpha agonists, are non-stimulant medicines that are also sometimes used to treat ADHD. Examples include clonidine (Catapres) and guanfacine (Intuniv).

Atomoxetine (Strattera) also has FDA-approval for the treatment of ADHD. It's a non-stimulant more similar to the SNRI antidepressants. But the agency has also issued warnings that children and teens who take it may have suicidal thoughts.

The FDA requires all ADHD drugs to include patient medication guides that detail serious outcomes from the use of the drugs, including a slightly higher risk of stroke, heart attack and sudden death, and psychiatric problems like becoming manic or psychotic.

From: Drugs to Treat Mental Illness WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Mental Health: ''Mental Health Medications.'' 

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: ''Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome.'' 

Jose, M. July 15, 1993. New England Journal of Medicine,

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on November 20, 2017

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Mental Health: ''Mental Health Medications.'' 

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: ''Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome.'' 

Jose, M. July 15, 1993. New England Journal of Medicine,

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on November 20, 2017

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What drugs treat mental illness in children?

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