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What is cyclothymic disorder?

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Cyclothymic disorder is often thought of as a mild form of bipolar disorder. You have low-grade high periods (hypomanias) as well as brief, fleeting periods of depression that don't last as long (less than 2 weeks at a time) as a major depressive episode. The hypomanias are similar to those seen in bipolar II disorder and don't progress to full-blown manias. For example, you may feel an exaggerated sense of productivity or power, but you don't lose connection with reality. They tend to not be as disabling as they are with bipolar disorder.

SOURCES: 

MedlinePlus: "Dysthymia" and "Cyclothymia." 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Dysthymic Disorder: When Depression Lingers." 

EMedicine: "Dysthymic Disorder." 

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Depression."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Cyclothymia (Cyclothymic Disorder)." 

World Health Organization: "What Is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Persistent Depressive Disorder."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD)."

BASC 3: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on February 18, 2020

SOURCES: 

MedlinePlus: "Dysthymia" and "Cyclothymia." 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Dysthymic Disorder: When Depression Lingers." 

EMedicine: "Dysthymic Disorder." 

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Depression."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Cyclothymia (Cyclothymic Disorder)." 

World Health Organization: "What Is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Persistent Depressive Disorder."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD)."

BASC 3: "Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on February 18, 2020

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