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What medications can help with treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?

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Antidepressants are often the first medications prescribed for OCD. depending on your age, health, and symptoms. Your doctor may have you try these or other antidepressants:

Clomipramine (Anafranil)

Fluoxetine (Prozac)

Fluvoxamine (Luvox)

Paroxetine (Paxil)

Sertraline (Zoloft)

It can take a couple of months for OCD drugs to start to work. They also can give you side effects, like dry mouth, nausea, and thoughts of suicide. Call your doctor or 911 right away if you have thoughts about killing yourself.

From: What Are the Treatments for OCD? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: When Unwanted Thoughts or Irresistible Actions Take Over," "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)."

OCD-UK: "Understanding what drives OCD."

Mayo Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder," "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),” "Deep brain stimulation."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: When Unwanted Thoughts or Irresistible Actions Take Over," "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)."

OCD-UK: "Understanding what drives OCD."

Mayo Clinic: "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder," "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),” "Deep brain stimulation."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 12, 2018

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