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What's the difference between dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia?

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Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness involving chronic (or recurrent) psychosis, characterized mainly by hearing or seeing things that aren't real (hallucinations) and thinking or believing things with no basis in reality (delusions). Contrary to popular misconceptions, people with schizophrenia do not have multiple personalities, which is common in people with dissociative identity disorder. Delusions are the most common psychotic symptom in schizophrenia; hallucinations, particularly hearing voices, are apparent in about half to three quarters of people with the illness. Suicide is a risk with both schizophrenia and dissociative identity disorder, although patients with multiple personalities have a history of suicide attempts more often than other psychiatric patients.

SOURCES:

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Dissociative Identity Disorder."

Mayo Clinic: "Dissociative disorders."

 

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 22, 2019

SOURCES:

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Dissociative Identity Disorder."

Mayo Clinic: "Dissociative disorders."

 

 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on July 22, 2019

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What is derealization in dissociative identity disorder?

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